Unholy Night

Unholy Night

Book - 2012
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From the author of the New York Times bestselling Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, comes UNHOLY NIGHT, the next evolution in dark historical revisionism.

They're an iconic part of history's most celebrated birth. But what do we really know about the Three Kings of the Nativity, besides the fact that they followed a star to Bethlehem bearing strange gifts? The Bible has little to say about this enigmatic trio. But leave it to Seth Grahame-Smith, the brilliant and twisted mind behind Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and Pride and Prejudice and Zombies to take a little mystery, bend a little history, and weave an epic tale.

In Grahame-Smith's telling, the so-called "Three Wise Men" are infamous thieves, led by the dark, murderous Balthazar. After a daring escape from Herod's prison, they stumble upon the famous manger and its newborn king. The last thing Balthazar needs is to be slowed down by young Joseph, Mary and their infant. But when Herod's men begin to slaughter the first born in Judea, he has no choice but to help them escape to Egypt.

It's the beginning of an adventure that will see them fight the last magical creatures of the Old Testament; cross paths with biblical figures like Pontius Pilate and John the Baptist; and finally deliver them to Egypt. It may just be the greatest story never told.
Publisher: New York : Grand Central Pub., 2012.
Edition: First edition.
ISBN: 9780446563093
Branch Call Number: GRA
Characteristics: 307 pages ; 24 cm

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Ronica_83
Jan 20, 2016

Loved this book! Of the books of have read by this author, this one was the best. I like how he twisted the Greatest Story Ever Told. It was a fast-read, full of action and drama. There were parts that made me cry, and parts that made me laugh out loud. This book will stay in my memory for some time. I may even purchase it in the near future.

c
cecilsgirl
Jun 17, 2013

Out of the last 3 published novels of Grahame-Smith's, this one, is hands down, my favorite. It was a fast and funny read. Sure, not all of the bible facts were correct, but it's fiction. The author created great twists and surprising moments. A very good read!

q
QUEEN1
Mar 07, 2013

Loved this book! Biblical history with a twist. Humorous, horrifying, and thought provoking, in the end it proves that anyone can receive redemption (of sorts), no matter who or what they are.

marysneedle Aug 03, 2012

This book was a page turner and I could barely put it down. The author takes a piece of a very familiar story where very little is actually known and tells a tale that will have you on the edge of your seat.
I was a little dubious about it at first, but as I continued to read and understand that the author was not trying to trash the birth of Jesus but fill in a gap where very little is known about the three wise men, I became more comfortable. After all God can work in mysterious ways. I really loved how the author captured the essence of each one of the characters. Warning for those who don’t like blood and gore, this has a lot of violence but then again so does the history of that period in time.

f
Farleyas
Jul 02, 2012

This book was a brilliant adventure story and brilliantly crafted. I loved the point of view and the flow kept me captivated until the very end. I think this is the best Grahame-Smith book and his true talents are beginning to shine. While this story is wrought with tragedy it still possesses a beautiful hilarity and softness of heart. Would definitely recommend it to everyone unless violence is off limits.

k
Keogh
May 02, 2012

Deviously clever, and not at all the sacrilege you might expect, given that this is the same author who so brilliantly twisted literature and history. The book plays around with the Nativity story, particularly the place of the Wise Men. In this tale, the Wise Men aren't kings or philosophers but petty thieves on the run from Herod who come across Mary, Joseph, and the infant Jesus. The primary character Balthazar, known as the Antioch Ghost, is a formidable protagonist who believes in little but himself, a hard man who gradually becomes sympathetic to the reader. By the end you'll really like him. And the novel has good villains and quasi-villains, in the form of a despicable Herod the Great, a silent and mysterious wild card, and a surprising young Pontius Pilate. Grahame-Smith does a good job moving the story forward as the fugitives evade Herod's army and the Roman army, as well as a supernatural force of old working against them. The book has the modern sensibility of the writer, but at the same time still feels grounded in the past. Funny at times, and well paced action filled at others, it's a good read. Just as long as you don't mind the tweaking of the story...

ohtethys Mar 27, 2012

In Grahame-Smith's telling, the so-called "Three Wise Men" are infamous thieves, led by the dark, murderous Balthazar. After a daring escape from Herod's prison, they stumble upon the famous manger and its newborn king. The last thing Balthazar needs is to be slowed down by young Joseph, Mary and their infant. But when Herod's men begin to slaughter the first born in Judea, he has no choice but to help them escape to Egypt.

It's the beginning of an adventure that will see them fight the last magical creatures of the Old Testament; cross paths with biblical figures like Pontius Pilate and John the Baptist; and finally deliver them to Egypt. It may just be the greatest story never told.

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