Lost Highway

Lost Highway

DVD - 2008
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Fred Madison is a saxophonist who finds a videotape on his doorstep that shows the interior of his house, he becomes convinced that someone has broken in and calls the police. Fred finds another videotape showing him killing his wife. The police arrest and accuse him, under mysterious circumstances, of murdering his wife. In prison, he inexplicably morphs into a young man named Pete Dayton and begins living a completely different life. When Pete is released, his and Fred's paths begin to cross in a surreal, suspenseful web of intrigue, orchestrated by a shady gangster boss named Dick Laurent.

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m
Matthew79
Oct 30, 2017

My favorite Lynch. The atmosphere and ambience is unbeatable. A subtle masterpiece of simplicity and ethereal strangeness...

v
VonHafenstaaad
Jun 03, 2017

It's one of the downright spookiest films I've ever seen, and it gives me chills just to recall it.

t
TheeAvebury
Dec 23, 2016

Excellent David Lynch film- it might be considered one of his lesser known works but it really is very powerful. Worth watching.

l
lukasevansherman
Jun 20, 2016

"We've met before, haven't we?" I often have to watch a David Lynch movie multiple times to, well, get it is the wrong way to put it. If you go into a Lynch film trying to get it, you're kinda missing the point. Anyway, "Lost Highway," like "Muholland Drive" and "Blue Velvet" is surrealist noir, for lack of a better term. Bill Pullman plays a saxophonist married to Patricia Arquette. They start receiving mysterious videotapes of their house sent by a very creepy man (Richard Blake). Then Pullman's accused of killing Arquette, jailed, and, well, he turns into another guy, played by Balthazar Getty. Following this? I can't tell if the three lead actors' lack of affect is intentional or if they are just bad. Either way it works. Blake as the white faced mystery man is the film's most unsettling aspect. Richard Pryor and Jack "Elephant Man" both have small parts that would be their last. It's a head trip of a movie, sometimes brilliant, sometimes absurd. The eclectic soundtrack was partially put together by Trent Reznor and features Marilyn Manson (boo), Lou Reed (yeah), and Bowie, whose "I'm Deranged" is used both at the beginning and end. David Foster Wallace wrote a great essay about the making of the film that's include in "A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again."
"I like to remember things my own way."

r
replicant30
Jun 10, 2016

Phase 1 of Lynch's Hollywood History Tour that ends with the Inland Empire (2006). The Moebius strip intro/outro of highway stripes blurring reality, coupled with the Bowie song, telegraphs all that is to occur. It's worth watching Maya Deren's Meshes of the Afternoon (1943) as visual and cinematic reference to this Lynch work.

s
SeattleSueLibrary
Jul 18, 2015

Like all of Lynch's work, this film successfully jars the viewer out of his/her comfort zone in ways both odd/bizarre and simultaneously familiar. Instead of rejecting it for what it is not, experience it for what it is: finding the horror in a seemingly "normal" life, mutating the characters, and bending time.

A highlight for me was Robert Blake's Mysterious Man. Brilliant.

k
kcdave11
Feb 24, 2015

Just picked it up out of holds. Been waiting......... Hope its good

Marinetti Feb 10, 2015

This film really seems to rub some people the wrong way, I suppose that's because it is so successful at being disturbing. The structure of the movie is a mobius strip, an unending nightmare loop, and is one of Lynch's most frightening films on a visceral level.

m
Monolith
May 16, 2012

Creepy. Bizarre. Baffling. Frustrating. I was left disillusioned after viewing this David Lynch psychological thriller. It just made no damn sense. And I'm well aware that Lynch's filmmaking is inherently weird and eccentric, but he just drove his Cadillac off the cliff with this one. He should donate his brain to science. Still, I did enjoy the experience. Robert Loggia's explosive road rage incident added some humor; I like Bill Pullman as an actor; Robert Blake was perfect to give anyone nightmares as Mystery Man; and Patricia Arquette's sexy femme fatale role(s) were mesmerizing. Too bad Gary Busey's nutjob personality wasn't really taken advantage of. It doesn't hold a candle to "Blue Velvet" in my arrogant opinion, but "Lost Highway" was a helluva ride.

d
DF
Dec 15, 2010

Don't bother.

I'm not saying this completely stinks because it doesn't. It's just that David Lynch will never again make something that rivals the Elephant Man or Eraserhead. The plot in this movie seems too intentionally zany and the soundtrack makes the craziness more cheesy than intense.

Ignore this and see Eraserhead and Elephant Man instead. If you already have, just watch them again.

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m
Monolith
May 16, 2012

Guard Johnny Mack: "Captain Luneau?" Captain Luneau: "Yeah, Mack?" Guard Johnny Mack: "Captain, this is some spooky sh*t we got here!"

m
Monolith
May 16, 2012

Mr. Eddy: "This is where mechanical excellence and one thousand four hundred horsepower pays off."

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